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Join us on May 6th 2017, for a peaceful march starting and concluding at Nathan Phillips Square, to raise awareness for mental illness and demonstrate the importance of mental health care improvements. 

Bring your signs, your loved ones, and your voice.

 

While fantastic initiatives have increased awareness and helped reduce some of the stigma surrounding mental health issues, the supply for mental health services does not meet the demand. More and more people are feeling comfortable to speak out and ask for help, only to find there are not enough services available when they do. 

The recent federal health accord committed 5 billion additional dollars to mental health care over the next 10 years – Ontario’s share is 1.92 billion dollars. While this sounds like a substantial amount, and it's a great start, when broken down among the population of Ontario it represents only about $14 per person per year.

Canada prides itself on having a universal healthcare system, yet when it comes to mental health care, a two-tier system still exists - those who can afford to pay for immediate care receive it, while those who cannot are forced to wait, often with fatal consequences.

Too many Canadians are falling through the cracks due to a lack of funding for mental health care, resulting in staggering economic and human costs. It's time for more than talk. It's time for ACTION.

 

Location

Nathan Phillips Square

100 Queen St. West

Toronto, ON M5H 2N

 
 

Route Map:

 

Mission

WE ARE CALLING ON THE FEDERAL & PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS TO :

1. Treat mental health no differently than physical health.
If you broke your arm, would you expect to wait over a year for a cast? If you urgently needed your appendix removed, would you expect to wait over a year for surgery? If you needed chemotherapy or radiation to treat cancer, would you expect to wait over a year before your first treatment?

2. Increase funding & services for mental health care.
Only 7% of all Canadian healthcare dollars go towards mental health. Follow the recommendation of the The Mental Health Commission of Canada and increase this amount to a minimum of 9%. The recent federal health accord committed 5 billion additional dollars to mental health care over the next 10 years – Ontario’s share is 1.92 billion dollars. While this sounds like a substantial amount, and it's a great start, when broken down among the population of Ontario it represents only about $14 per person per year.

3. Make a full range of mental health services and supports accessible to every person in Ontario, when and where needed.
There is currently a two-tier system in Ontario. Many cannot access services due to the cost, and when funded services are available, the wait-times are often far too long. More services need to be accessible to more people and more quickly.

4. Create a National Suicide Prevention Strategy.
Suicide prevention strategies save lives. In 21 OECD countries that implemented strategies, suicide rates dropped – primarily among youth and the elderly, the two populations most at risk in Canada. Both the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO) have called on all nations to implement national strategies.

5. Comply with the orders given by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal for First Nations children.
This includes an investment of a minimum of $155 million for child welfare among Indigenous Canadians, as well as fully implementing 'Jordan's Principle' to ensure that all First Nations children can access government services on the same terms as any other Canadian child.

 

 

Implementing the above will improve and save thousands of lives each year.

Featured Speakers

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Michael Landsberg

Founder of SickNotWeak, sports journalist, and former host of TSN's Off the Record.

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Andrew Jensen

Canadian PGA golfer, speaker and Ambassador of Bell Let's Talk.

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LYNN Keane

Mental health advocate, speaker, journalist & author of Give Sorrow Words.